South Asian Studies

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: My Enemy's Enemy: India in Afghanistan from the Soviet Invasion to the US Withdrawal

Tuesday, 20 February, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

The archetype of ‘my enemy’s enemy is my friend’, India’s political and economic presence in Afghanistan is often viewed as a Machiavellian ploy aimed against Pakistan.

Speaker(s): 
Avinash Paliwal (SOAS)

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: Ambivalence, Ambiguity and Alienation: Making Sense of 'Tension' in North India

Tuesday, 13 February, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

How can we understand 'tension', the experience of rigidity that often underpins systemic structures of domination, epistemic violence as well as physical aggression in South Asia?

Speaker(s): 
Raphael Susewind (KCL)

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: Querying the Cosmopolitan in Sri Lankan and Indian Ocean History

Tuesday, 6 February, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

The presenters will reflect on their proposal to draw Sri Lanka into the paradigm of global history through the recently published edited collection Sri Lanka at the Crossroads of History (UCL, 2017 - the full volume can be downloaded free of charge at

Speaker(s): 
Zoltán Biedermann (UCL)
Alan Strathern (Brasenose)

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: Violence, Rents and Investment: Explaining Growth Divergence in South Asia

Tuesday, 30 January, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

Why have growth rates have dramatically diverged between India and Pakistan since the 1990s, when their economic and political institutions have increasingly converged?

Speaker(s): 
Adnan A. Naseemullah (KCL)

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: The Rohingya Exodus: Orchestrated Violence and Strategies of Survival

Tuesday, 23 January, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

The Rohingyas violently expelled by Myanmar are not recognized as international refugees by Bangladesh. Despite lacking citizenship and the right to work, they have sought to survive through covert employment in labour markets and clientelist relations that provide protection for a price.

Speaker(s): 
Shapan Adnan

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