Russian and East European Studies

The bivocal nation: memory and identity on the edge of empire

Thursday, 1 December, 2016 - 13:00
Syndicate Room

How is a nation imagined in a place that exists on the “Edge of Empires?” Or what is nation-ness like in a place that is construed as an ambiguous point between “east” and “west?” Or prevailing in a liminal state of becoming and unbecoming: European, Soviet, postcolonial, developing, modernizing

Speaker(s): 
Dr Nutsa Batiashvili (REES & Free University of Tbilisi)

Part-time Departmental Lecturer in East European Politics

Russian and East European Studies, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies

Grade 7: Salary in the range £31,076 - -£38,183 p.a. (pro rata)

We are seeking a part-time (60%), fixed-term Departmental Lecturer to assist in teaching and supervision for the MSc and MPhil in Russian and East European Studies. The post is a part time fixed term post until 30 September 2019 made available due to the secondment of the permanent post holder.

When informal institutions change: institutional reforms and informal practices in the former Soviet Union

Tuesday, 8 November, 2016 - 13:00
Syndicate Room, St Antony's College

What happens to informal institutions and practices when political actors decide to implement democratic institutional reforms aimed at relieving formal institutions of informal constraints?

Speaker(s): 
Dr Huseyn Aliyev

Parts of a circle: a film history of the roots of the Nagorny Karabakh conflict

Thursday, 10 November, 2016 -
17:00 to 19:00
Syndicate Room, St Antony's College, University of Oxford

This one hour film is the first in a three part series about the Nagorny Karabakh conflict which traces its roots from the late Soviet period to the outbreak of serious fighting in 1992.

Speaker(s): 
Jonathan Aves (Conciliation Resources)

A usable past in a global world: the case of Russia

Friday, 4 November, 2016 - 17:00
Syndicate Room, St Antony's College

Rising frustration over Russia’s actions in Ukraine and elsewhere have led some Western leaders to conclude that Russian leaders are living in a “different world.”  My presentation will examine the source of these frustrations by analyzing the national narratives that shape interpretations of

Speaker(s): 
Professor James V. Wertsch (Washington University in St Louis)

Pages

Subscribe to Russian and East European Studies