People

Academic - Affiliate

  • Dr. Alfred Gathorne-Hardy

    I joined SIAS in October 2011, where I was a researcher on the ESRC/DfID funded project: ‘The Materiality of Rice’, led by Professor Barbara Harriss-White.  I am now a Junior Research Fellow at Somerville College, and convene and lecture the geography MSc elective, Global Environmental Change and Food Security.

    Both food and a healthy environment are essential for human existence.  Food production at the scale required to feed the present population inevitably damages the environment.   This damage is at such a scale to seriously threaten human existence.

  • Senior Research Fellow, Area Studies; Co-ordinator South Asian Research Cluster

    I joined SIAS in 2007 but I joined Oxford in 1987 after 7 years teaching social science to medical doctors at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. My interests are Political economy; agriculture, energy and food; aspects of deprivation; India’s informal capitalism; rural and local development; low carbon transition. I used to teach Indian political economy on the MSc in Contemporary India. (Before that – M Phil in Development Studies: core course, options in gender and development, Indian political economy, health and development, rural development)

  • Teaching and Research Associate

    I am a Research Associate in Japanese Studies and a Research Associate at the Centre for Time Use Research. My research interests lie in the field of family sociology. I am currently working on two projects: The first one analyses the gender balance in the domestic division of labour in several East Asian societies. A pilot study for this project, “Domestic division of labour and fertility preference in China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan”, has been published in Demographic Research in 2017. The second project looks at class differences in parenting strategies in Japan.

  • For twenty five years  I have taught literature for a couple of months each year in universities all over Russia, and have built up many contacts particularly outside Moscow and St Petersburg.  I am ready to advise M.Phil students and others on the Russian provinces, academic contacts and visas. In Russia I have published books about Britain, and in Britain  articles about life in Russia.

  • MES Associate (SPF Programme)
  • Lecturer in Modern Indian Studies

    I completed my doctoral studies in anthropology at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London in 2008. I also undertook a postdoctoral research (2008-2011) in anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. My work, through long-term empirical fieldwork and critical engagement with social theory, develops theoretical and empirical insights into the political economy of poverty, violence and development in India in the context of the growing Maoist insurgency and counterinsurgency.

  • REES Senior Research Fellow

    Alex Pravda's research interests are Soviet and post-Soviet Russian foreign policy; he also has an interest in the international dimensions of East European politics. Alex Pravda is also Fellow of the Russian and East European Centre at St Antony's. 

  • Postdoctoral Research Officer

    I trained as a social anthropologist at Edinburgh, UCL and the LSE, and joined the Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme in the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies in Oxford in 2008. My research is based in rural Andhra Pradesh, Southeast India and is primarily concerned with Dalits (earlier known as ‘Untouchables’), especially Dalit women. My work looks at different forms of inequality (caste, class and gender), education, identity, affirmative action and labour relations.

  • Professor Arthur Stockwin
    Emeritus Fellow

    I first became interested in Japan while embarking on a doctoral thesis at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra back in 1960. My initial topic had been Soviet foreign policy in Asia, as I had Russian from an army course during British national service in the mid-1950s. For various reasons, however, that topic did not work out, but in pre-researching it I discovered Japan and switched to a topic in Japanese politics and foreign policy. This meant starting to study Japanese.

  • Dr. Ann Waswo
    Emeritus Fellow

    As often happened many decades ago in the USA, I drifted into Japanese Studies rather than pursuing a long-held curiosity about Japan or following a coherent, career-minded plan while at university. Had it not been for the Security Treaty demonstrations in Tokyo in 1960, which figured prominently in the American media, and a professor (Thomas C. Smith) running the required historiography seminar for Stanford history majors I attended in my third year, I might have ended up doing something completely different with my life.

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