Academic Staff

Academic - Affiliate

  • Lecturer in Modern Indian Studies

    I completed my doctoral studies in anthropology at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London in 2008. I also undertook a postdoctoral research (2008-2011) in anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. My work, through long-term empirical fieldwork and critical engagement with social theory, develops theoretical and empirical insights into the political economy of poverty, violence and development in India in the context of the growing Maoist insurgency and counterinsurgency.

  • REES Senior Research Fellow

    Alex Pravda's research interests are Soviet and post-Soviet Russian foreign policy; he also has an interest in the international dimensions of East European politics. Alex Pravda is also Fellow of the Russian and East European Centre at St Antony's. 

  • Professor Arthur Stockwin
    Emeritus Fellow

    I first became interested in Japan while embarking on a doctoral thesis at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra back in 1960. My initial topic had been Soviet foreign policy in Asia, as I had Russian from an army course during British national service in the mid-1950s. For various reasons, however, that topic did not work out, but in pre-researching it I discovered Japan and switched to a topic in Japanese politics and foreign policy. This meant starting to study Japanese.

  • Emeritus Fellow; LAC Associate Member

    Rosemary Thorp was Reader in the Economics of Latin America and is an Emeritus Fellow of St Antony's College. She was for three periods Director of the Latin American Centre. During 2003-04 she was Director of Queen Elizabeth House, the University's Institute of Development Studies. In December 2001 she became for five years the Chair of Trustees of Oxfam G.B. Her “Progress, Poverty and Exclusion: an Economic History of Latin America in the Twentieth Century” , written at the invitation of the Inter-American Development Bank, is a much-used textbook.

  • Dr. Ann Waswo
    Emeritus Fellow

    As often happened many decades ago in the USA, I drifted into Japanese Studies rather than pursuing a long-held curiosity about Japan or following a coherent, career-minded plan while at university. Had it not been for the Security Treaty demonstrations in Tokyo in 1960, which figured prominently in the American media, and a professor (Thomas C. Smith) running the required historiography seminar for Stanford history majors I attended in my third year, I might have ended up doing something completely different with my life.

Pages